Nutrition Facts

This screen shows food nutrient information in the familiar "Nutrition Facts" format.

By default, nutrition facts are displayed for standard "2,000" calories diet, but it could be displayed based on your personalized nutrition plan.

Sometimes deciding by a food label whether you should eat the food or skip it could be non-trivial. For example, what is more important - 6g of saturated fat or 30% of Vitamin C in the food? Which one outweighs the other?

To help you interpret food labels, MyNetDiary provides food score - displayed in the top right corner. The food score is calculated based solely on the food's Nutrition Facts. The methodology was published in the June 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, in the article Modeling Expert Opinions on Food Healthfulness: A Nutrition Metric by Jolie M. Martin, MBA, PhD; John Beshears, AM; Katherine L. Milkman; Max H. Bazerman, PhD; Lisa A. Sutherland, PhD, and used by MyNetDiary with permission. The study distills expert knowledge of leading U.S. nutrition experts into a simple nutrition metric, to help all of us to make more healthful food choices.

For typical food amounts, the food score varies from about +5 for foods that nutrition expert are likely to consider more healthy, to zero for average foods, and to -5 for foods likely to be considered not very healthy. For example, green beans get 3.6, pasta gets 0.3, and single meat patty burger gets -2.7.

Please note that the food score does not include calories - only nutrients. You should always strive to meet both your calorie and nutrient goals for the whole day. The Analysis screen provides additional details and recommendations.

Finally, please note that although we make every effort to improve quality of the food database, not all foods have all nutrients provided by the food vendor, or entered into the food database. In this cases, the calculated food score may be off.