Is there a connection between saturated fat and diabetes? Here's what you need to know

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Did you know that foods rich in saturated fat like cheese and meat lovers pizza are associated with developing type 2 diabetes? Read on to learn more and discover healthier but still satisfying substitutions.

Saturated fat and diabetes

The connection between saturated fat and diabetes explained

Foods high in saturated fat contribute to a phenomenon called insulin resistance, also known as IR. IR is often a component of type 2 diabetes where the body doesn't use insulin adequately, resulting in elevated blood sugars. Prolonged high blood sugar causes silent damage to your tissues. Over time this damage can lead to problems with your kidneys, eyes, heart, and other organs.

What are the most common sources of saturated fats?

Many people eat more saturated fat than they realize. Here are some familiar sources

Swap saturated fats for these heart-healthy fats

You'll improve your heart health and cut down on your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating less saturated fat.

Try choosing these fats and foods (rich in mono and polyunsaturated fats) instead

Understand where your fat comes from with MyNetDiary

Curious how your fat intake stacks up? MyNetDiary allows you to track your total fat and the breakdown between fat components such as trans fat, polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and saturated fat. MyNetDiary's default goal for saturated fat is 10% of calories or less. If you have diabetes or are at increased risk for heart disease, your doctor's recommendation may be lower. From the Coach tab in the iPhone app, scroll down to nutrient analysis to see Fat Components.

My favorite hacks to swap out sat fat for healthier fat

The link between saturated fat and diabetes risk is still evolving in the research arena. However, there is plenty of strong scientific evidence showing that the healthiest habits to prevent type 2 diabetes include maintaining or achieving a healthy body weight, decreasing your intake of simple sugars, and eating whole grains, lean proteins, vegetables, and healthy fats. In addition to eating a healthy diet and managing weight, experts recommend getting in 150 minutes of moderate physical activity a week. These beneficial lifestyle components and regularly visiting your doctor to monitor other health parameters are sure to make a difference!

Still new to MyNetDiary? Learn more today by downloading the app for FREE.

Diabetes->Preventing Diabetes Nutrients->Fats
Jul 21, 2021
Joanna Kriehn
Joanna Kriehn, MS, RDN, CDCES - Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist (CDCES)

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